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Reynolds Week: Advice for Preparing Young Reporters

From right, editors Greer, Lowry and Quillen meet with professors at Reynolds Week 2015.

From right, editors Greer, Lowry and Quillen meet with professors at Reynolds Week 2015.

Journalism professors attending Reynolds Week got plenty of help to shape their syllabuses and offer the latest teaching techniques to their student.

But they wound up the week with conversations with the people who know best about what happens after class: editors and former students.

The first panel, called “What Editors Expect,” feature Kim Quillen, assistant business editor at The Arizona Republic, Tracy Greer, the digital media editor at KJZZ in Phoenix and Ilana Lowery, editor of the Phoenix Business Journal. They offered tips   on what professors can do to better prepare students before they enter the newsroom for the first time. That advice included:

  • “New to you does not mean news…” Young journalists are often excited by new pieces of information they hear and want to turn them into stories. The problem, especially on the business beat where young people often learn new things every day, is that these ideas aren’t always newsworthy. The editors advised professors to make sure young journalists understand they need to find the angle on what makes an idea “news” before they invest their time creating a pitch or pursuing a lead.
  • Young journalists should feel comfortable with numbers and business concepts. This may seem obvious, but for those covering general news or beats that sometimes involve money and business angles, even simple terms and concepts can be intimidating. Don’t let them “run away from the business story.” Help foster their comfort with numbers, business terms and common tools like Excel spreadsheets, even students who don’t necessarily plan on covering money in the future.
  • Even on the business beat, multimedia is incredibly important. While covering money, editors will ask young journalists to take photos, video, audio recordings, make infographics and other forms of multimedia so prevalent in our online world. This is the reality of the business today. Any extra skills a young journalist can bring to the newsroom will be used, especially if editors find themselves temporarily short staffed and need reporters to fill in for other positions.
  • It’s so often common sense, but young people should be reminded of the professional expectations in the newsroom. Especially in covering money, young journalists will be interacting with professionals. It’s not always a problem, but reporters fresh out of school need to know what the expectations will be for how they look and how they act on the job. As one editor put it, “I tell my reporters to dress so they can cover to the Governor’s office in the morning and a fire in the afternoon.” Their actions and attitudes will matter with editors, other reporters and sources. Especially as interns, the limited time they have on the job means any major mistakes will affect their reputation.
  • Young people can bring a lot to a newsroom. Millennials have their own unique perspective on the world, which can be invaluable in developing story ideas, angles and interacting with sources on the beat. Help them develop confidence in their own abilities and ideas. Let them know that they will be intimidated or nervous when they start their first job, but their work will be important to the news organization and to readers. Helping bolster a student’s confidence in talking on the phone, organizing stories and staying persistent while putting a story together will serve them in their early years after entering the workplace.

From left, Hansen, Lange and Remillard ponder a professor's question.

From left, Hansen, Lange and Remillard ponder a professor’s question.

On the next panel, Cronkite School graduates Molly Lange, a reporter at KYMA News 11 in Yuma, Kristena Hansen, a business reporter KJZZ in Phoenix and Mark Remillard, reporter at KTAR923 in Phoenix, discussed their time as journalism students and what helped prepare them for the real world of a reporter in  “What I Learned – and Wish I’d Learned.”

  • To the surprise of many educators in the room (and to the chagrin of many current students everywhere), the panelists suggested professors give quick deadlines on their assignments. There is a definite adjustment for young reporters on their first “real world” assignments, especially when they are expected to have a finished product in only a few hours. The only way to properly prepare students for this workplace reality is to give them that experience as soon as possible.
  • “Public records, public records, public records.” Each panelist suggested more work with public records in school, from sending in requests to knowing where and what to look for. Having that knowledge would have been invaluable in their first few months on the job. Not only is it important in the day-to-day aspects of reporting, but experience with public records can make or break major stories.
  • Assignments based on current events are incredibly beneficial for students when they enter the workplace, according to the panel. This help students prepare for what they’ll face on their first assignments, and also keeps them up to date on topics and issues that they will work with. Instead of spending extra time researching, these assignments give the knowledge they need to start their work on a story right away.
  • Internships are still crucial for the development of young journalists. This is often where the passion for reporting is flamed and the foundation of their careers will be set. Providing students these opportunities and working with organizations to foster relationships is a must for educators and their universities. It will give students number of clips, recommendations and connections that are useful as they advance in their careers. It’s also where students will understand the impact of their work and learn just how important good journalism is for our society and our world.
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Reynolds Week: Fellows pay respects to #JeSuisCharlie

Reynolds Week fellows stand in front of the first amendment at the Cronkite School.

Reynolds Week fellows stand in front of the first amendment at the Cronkite School.

The horrific attacks on journalists at the French satirical newspaper Charlie Hebdo have generated sympathy around the world. On Wednesday, Reynolds Week fellows participated in the tribute at the Cronkite School at Arizona State University.

Standing before a mural of the first amendment, the fellows held up placards reading, “Je Suis Charlie” (I Am Charlie) — the hashtag that has become a universal sentiment.

Several fellows posted group and individual photos on Twitter.

Reynolds Week fellows Janine Weisman (left), Molly Dill and Lauren Ohnesorge posted their sign on Twitter.

Reynolds Week fellows Janine Weisman (left), Molly Dill and Lauren Ohnesorge posted their sign on Twitter.

Meanwhile, the Je Suis Charlie movement has made itself known in a number of public places. NASDAQ, the over the counter stock market, displayed a tribute in Times Square on Thursday.

Photo courtesy of NASDAQ

Photo courtesy of NASDAQ

And, the Eiffel Tower went dark Thursday night in Paris.

Eiffel Tower

The Eiffel Tower tribute. Photo courtesy of Mashable.

We mourn the 10 journalists and two security staffers who were killed in the attacks and send our best wishes to the injured. #JeSuisCharlie has united journalists and the public in a heartfelt movement.

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Reynolds Week: tales from PBS’ Nerd In Chief

The #MoneyNerds meet PBS Nerd in Chief, Bob Beard.

The #MoneyNerds meet PBS Nerd in Chief, Bob Beard, and are joined by a few special guests.

Our Reynolds Week fellows are known as the #Moneynerds. The inspiration for our hashtag comes from public television — specifically the #PBSNerds.

On Tuesday, the #MoneyNerds got to meet the PBS Nerd In Chief, Bob Beard, the director of special events at Arizona PBS, which airs on Channel 8 in Phoenix. It which is under the direction of the Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication, and is the second-most watched PBS station in the U.S., behind its counterpart in Portland, Oregon.

(Read our Storify on Beard’s visit with the #MoneyNerds.)

Beard’s academic expertise is the phenomenon of geek and nerd culture. His research shows that 58 percent of Americans define geeks as “intelligent and attractive” (which promPBS Nerdpted one of my Twitter followers to respond, “Hello, ladies”). Given that the natural audience for public television includes this smart segment of the population, Beard set out to see what he could do to with the label.

Four years ago, he came up with the idea of holding a Nerd Walk during Arizona State University’s homecoming weekend. In the past, homecoming was reserved for traditional festivities which seem to favor jocks, cheerleaders and the cool crowd.

Beard, however, thought the nerds ought to have their own festivities. He tweaked the PBS logo to add black, nerdy glasses, and threw open the celebration to the PBS audience.

Now, the Nerd Walk draws people from across the Phoenix area, some bringing robots, some dressed as fantasy characters, all happy to wear pins bearing the PBS Nerd logo. PBS Nerd events have spread to other public television stations and campuses around the country.

It may not just be due to the nerds, but Arizona PBS ratings are soaring. Kelly McCullough, the general manager of Arizona PBS, told the #MoneyNerds that his station’s ratings are up 23 percent year over year.

Downton Abbey, the hit British program about the aristocratic Crawley family, is one reason. But so is the station’s programming, which is divided into three channels — Eight HD, with traditional PBS shows, Eight Life (cooking and gardening) and Eight World (travel and music).

The variety of programs means it’s likely that any viewer can indulge their tastes. As Beard puts it, “Everybody’s a nerd for something.”

 

 

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Reynolds Week: Reflections on purpose with BlogHer’s Elisa Camahort Page

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BlogHer co-founder Elisa Camahort Page. Photo by Dominic J. Valente.

To create a following online, one thing is pivotal for start-ups and, for that matter, any company: purpose.

That was just one of the many messages of Elisa Camahort Page, co-founder and COO of BlogHer, a web community dedicated to women’s blogs and media online, delivered on Monday. She spoke to Reynolds Week and Scripps-Howard Entrepreneurship Institute fellows at the Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication at Arizona State University.

BlogHer began as the project of three women bloggers looking to bolster female voices that had gone unheard in the blogging community. With a little bit of perseverance, it became a major player in the blogging world and was acquired in November by SheKnows Media.

It was the desire for a little “world domination” and to be the best in the business, Page said, that led to BlogHer’s success and its eventual purchase by SheKnows, which boasts 80 million unique visitors a month over its networks.

But the real secret for success online, according to Page, goes back to purpose. Startups need to have an idea of what they want to be guiding their content and business decisions.

“You need to serve the community you want to have, not necessarily the one you already have,” Page said.

BlogHer co-founder Elisa Camahort Page. Photo by Dominic J. Valente

Aim beyond your core audience, recommends Page. Photo by Dominic J. Valente

With so many choices online, Page said followers leave communities that don’t have something to offer. If you aren’t useful, there isn’t much reason for followers to be there.

But that doesn’t necessarily mean niches are key. A unique voice or perspective that offers the chance for followers to have some fun while online has proven successful time and time again.

As Page said, some people could blog the phone book and still make it interesting.

Purpose should also guide the use of social media, which Page said has overtaken the importance of search engines for generating traffic. Each site, from Facebook to Pinterest, has a different purpose and audience that will use contents from sites in different ways.

The idea also carries over to raising funds and creating revenue. Having a clear and concrete idea of what and where a company is going means an easier time asking people for money and support.

That doesn’t mean a strict rigidness is required for success. Page believes in the idea of being able to “pivot,” staying flexible and adapting to the inevitable change that companies face.

But there are just some things, and Page pointed to her own experiences with BlogHer for examples like future investments and content development, that need money if they are ever going to become a reality. Demonstrating how it fits in to your overall mission matters.

In the end, purpose is even imperative for the life of the entrepreneur, which, in Page’s experience, is almost completely void of balance. Having a goal and knowing what it will take makes risk much easier to navigate.

Page suggested asking one simple question when starting up online and in business: “What is the worst that could happen?” After that, it’s turning any fears concrete and avoiding the abstract.

If it isn’t going to end in death or injury, Page concluded, it’s certainly a risk worth taking.

Page says entrepreneurs should ask themselves, "What's the worst that can happen?" Photo by Dominic J. Valente

Page says entrepreneurs should ask themselves, “What’s the worst that can happen?” Photo by Dominic J. Valente

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Reynolds Week: The rising economic power of Latinos in the U.S.

 

Univision VP Chiqui Cartagena speaks to Reynolds Week 2015. Photo: Dominic J. Valente

Univision VP Chiqui Cartagena speaks to Reynolds Week 2015. Photo: Dominic J. Valente

The growing Hispanic population in the United States is set to shape businesses and the country’s economy in a big way over the next 50 years, according to Chiqui Cartagena, vice president of marketing for Univision.

Calling it a “Latino baby boom,” Cartagena, a seasoned journalist and media expert  who has worked with businesses for 20 years, spoke Monday on the impact natural born and immigrant Hispanics have had on shaping business and marketing strategies for companies looking for future growth.

Cartagena was the lunch time keynote speaker on the kickoff day of Reynolds Week at Arizona State University’s Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication. Her audience included journalists and professors taking part in the Reynolds Week program, as well as professors participating in the Scripps-Howard Entrepreneurship Institute, which is also being held this week at the Cronkite School.

(Follow the hashtags #moneynerds and #scrippsj for updates from the programs.)

“When companies like McDonald’s, Coke and Pepsi tell me they are focusing more on being multicultural, they are changing,” she said following her presentation. “Twenty years ago, they weren’t saying that. Now they get it.”

The U.S. Hispanic population is projected to increase for the next fifty years and expected to make up a larger part of the country’s population. By 2060, 30.6 percent of the American population will be Hispanic, while the non-Hispanic white population will make up 42.6 percent, according to projections.

The Latino population is growing everywhere. Photo: Dominic J. Valente

The Latino population is growing everywhere. Photo: Dominic J. Valente

Cartagena, author of the books Latino Boom! and Latino Boom II, says the boom is not confined to states Latinos have traditionally settled in, like Arizona, New Mexico, California and Texas, but has become a national phenomenon. Across the country, the Hispanic population doubled in 28 states over the last 13 years.

Following job opportunities, new patterns of population growth have developed as well, helping to support different economies that might have otherwise experienced a population decrease if not for the boom.

“We’re seeing a new pattern of Latino migration to the Midwest,” Cartagena said.

The growth is also fueled by a shift in the makeup of the Hispanic population, according to Cartagena. More and more Latinos are being born in the United States instead of emigrating from other countries, which has traditionally formed the makeup of the group.

That means the percent of the Hispanic population of working age will double by 2060, according to projections. Already, 29 percent of people in the Hispanic population are Millennials, a valuable age demographic to target for companies, compared to 22 percent in the non-Hispanic white population.

With the growth, Latinos represent more purchasing power and are becoming the “backbone” of the economy in the United States while more and more enter the middle and upper classes, Cartagena said. One in six consumers in the country are already Hispanic and, since 2000, the percent of the Latino population making over $100,000 a year has doubled from 7 to 13 percent.

Much of Cartagena’s time in the media industry has been spent convincing companies looking globally to “look in their own backyards” for opportunity. 

Photo: Dominic J. Valente

Photo: Dominic J. Valente

And the data backs that idea up – if Hispanics in the United States made up their own country, it would have a higher per capita income than any BRIC (Brazil, Russia, India and China) country worldwide, according Cartagena’s research.

That purchasing power means a lot of potential dollars across a number of industries. For instance, Hispanics already spend $90.7 billion on groceries consumed at home, impacting agriculture and the food industries. In the housing market, they are expected to represent half of all new home buyers by 2020.

Culturally, the population is on stable ground to support its place in the economy, now and in the future. Cartagena said research shows the Hispanic population is more concerned politically about education than it is about immigration reform, which is an issue often tied to its communities.

Ninety-four percent of Hispanic parents expect their children to go to college and 1 in 5 currently attends technical or vocational school. Not only does that mean the population will be more qualified to enter a variety of fields, but it will also spend more in support of schools and universities.

Altogether, Cartagena argued, the impact that Hispanics have economically can no longer be ignored. Still, problems with cultural perceptions, representations and portrayals, especially in the media, surround the community

But, as she has seen in the past, that change is certainly coming along as well, though more still needs to be done.

“The Hispanic community is really a business imperative for companies today,” she said.

Each member of the audience received a copy of Cartagena's book, Latino Boom II. Photo: Dominc J. Valente

Each member of the audience received a copy of Cartagena’s book, Latino Boom II

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Welcome, Reynolds Week 2015 Fellows!

MoneyNerdsWe’re so happy to welcome this year’s 2015 Reynolds Week Fellows to Arizona State University in Phoenix. Over the next three days, these journalists and professors will receive in-depth seminars on a wide variety of topics, ranging from financial statements to data visualization, CEO compensation to the skills editors are seeking from students.

The  Reynolds Week fellows join the 2015 Scripps-Howard Entrepreneurship Institute Fellows, also meeting this week at the Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication, for two keynote addresses. Monday’s lunchtime keynote speaker is Chiqui Cartagena, vice president of marketing for Univision and the foremost expert on trends concerning Latinos. Every fellow gets an autographed copy of her book, Latino Boom II.

See our Storify on Cartagena’s talk to the groups.

Later Monday, the Reynolds and Scripps-Howard fellows will hear from Elisa Camahort Page, co-founder of BlogHer.

Follow #MoneyNerds on Twitter for updates from Reynolds Week programs. Think about applying in 2016, and we’re also looking for applicants for the final Reynolds Visiting Professor position.

Here is this year’s group of Reynolds Fellows.

 Strictly Financials

  • Lauren Abdel-Razzaq, The Detroit News
  • Ben Bergman, Southern California Public Radio, Pasadena, Calif.
  • Nirmala Bhat, U-T San Diego
  • James Briggs, Baltimore Business Journal
  • Nicole Collins, Business Journal News Network, Syracuse, N.Y.
  • Molly Dill, BizTimes Media, Milwaukee
  • Terri Langford, The Texas Tribune, Austin, Texas
  • Celeste LeCompte, Nieman Foundation/Reynolds Fellow, Cambridge, Mass.
  • Issa Mansaray, The Africa Paper, Brooklyn Center, Minn.
  • Lourdes Medrano, freelance, Tucson, Ariz.
  • Erin Negley, Reading Eagle, Reading, Pa.
  • Lauren Ohnesorge, Triangle Business Journal, Raleigh, N.C.
  • Sarah Scully, Houston Chronicle
  • Yvonne Villarreal, Los Angeles Times
  • Andrea Vittorio, Bloomberg BNA, Arlington, Va.

 Business Journalism Professors

  • Andrew Cassel, Reynolds Visiting Professor, Penn State University, State College, Pa.
  • Michael Giusti, Loyola University of New Orleans
  • Paul Glader, The King’s College, New York
  • Gary Guffey, Johnson C. Smith University, Charlotte, N.C.
  • Thomas Hrach, University of Memphis, Tennessee
  • Jay Seidel, Fullerton College, Fullerton, Calif.
  • James Tennant, Mount Royal University, Calgary, Alberta, Canada
  • Venise Wagner, San Francisco State University
  • Janine Weisman, Roger Williams University, Bristol, R.I.
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Announcing the 2015 Reynolds Week Fellows

The Reynolds CenterThe Reynolds Center is delighted announce the journalists and professors who will take part in Reynolds Week 2015. The program takes place Jan. 5-7, at the Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication in Phoenix.

Reynolds Week is divided into two parts. The Strictly Financials seminar offers journalists a deep dive on a variety of money-related topics. The Business Journalism Professors seminar offers guidance to professors who are teaching business journalism or who plan to incorporate money themes in existing courses.

Each participant receives a fellowship valued at $1,500, covering tuition, hotel accommodations and meals. This year’s class includes 15 Strictly Financials fellows and nine Business Journalism professors.

This year’s fellows are:

Strictly Financials|

  • Lauren Abdel-Razzaq, The Detroit News, Detroit, MI
  • Ben Bergman, Southern California Public Radio, Pasadena, CA
  • Nirmala Bhat, U-T San Diego, San Diego, CA
  • James Briggs, Baltimore Business Journal, Baltimore, MD
  • Nicole Collins, Business Journal News Network, Syracuse, NY
  • Molly Dill, BizTimes Media, Milwaukee, WI
  • Terri Langford, The Texas Tribune, Austin, TX
  • Celeste LeCompte, Nieman Foundation/Reynolds Fellow, Cambridge, MA
  • Issa Mansaray, The Africa Paper, Brooklyn Center, MN
  • Lourdes Medrano, Freelance, Tucson, AZ
  • Erin Negley, Reading Eagle, Reading, PA
  • Lauren Ohnesorge, Triangle Business Journal, Raleigh, NC
  • Sarah Scully, Houston Chronicle, Houston, TX
  • Yvonne Villarreal, Los Angeles Times, Los Angeles, CA
  • Andrea Vittorio, Bloomberg BNA, Arlington, VA

Business Journalism Professors|

  • Andrew Cassel, Reynolds Visiting Professor, Penn State University
  • Michael Giusti, Loyola University of New Orleans, New Orleans, LA
  • Paul Glader, The King’s College, New York, NY
  • Gary Guffey, Johnson C. Smith University, Charlotte, NC
  • Thomas Hrach, University of Memphis, Memphis, TN
  • Jay Seidel, Fullerton College, Fullerton, CA
  • James Tennant, Mount Royal University, Calgary, Alberta, Canada
  • Venice Wagner, San Francisco State University, San Francisco, CA
  • Janine Weisman, Roger Williams University, Bristol, RI

 The Reynolds Center is based at the Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication at Arizona State University. We are funded through grants from the Donald W. Reynolds Foundation, based in Las Vegas.  

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LAST CHANCE, #MONEYNERDS: Apply For Reynolds Week 2015

Apply-Now-ButtonWe know you procrastinate. We all do. But even the Reynolds Center has its limits.

Apply NOW (and we mean NOW) to attend Reynolds Week 2015. The deadline is Saturday, Nov. 1, at 11:59 pm Pacific Time.

Choose from two tracks, for #moneynerds of all stripes:

Strictly Financials, a deep dive into financial and business topics for journalists, whether you cover money topics as a regular beat, or just on an occasional basis.
Business Professors Seminar, for people teaching at the college level who plan to teach finance topics, or want to include business journalism and money coverage in their curriculum.

Reynolds Week will be held Jan. 5-7, at the Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication at Arizona State University in downtown Phoenix. (Did we mention this is in Phoenix, in January?)

Tuition, lodging and most meals are covered by a $1,500 fellowship for those who are accepted. You only need to cover your airfare.

If you’ve come before, don’t let that stop you from returning. Past participants are welcome to reapply.

This year’s conference will feature a full lineup of fresh material and dynamic speakers. We’re super excited that the lunch keynote speaker on Jan. 5 will be  Chiqui Cartegena, vice president of corporate marketing for Univision. Cartegena is a Hispanic media and marketing pioneer with 25 years of experience developing publications appealing to Latinos, including People en Espanol.

She is the author of Latino Boom! and Latino Boom II.  She plans to bring a wealth of data and offer help on story ideas for journalists and assignments by professors.

Bonus: Reynolds Week participants will receive an autographed copy of her latest book.

Both sessions also will receive deep-data dive presentations taught by Dianne Finch, a Bloomberg News veteran and professor at Elon University whose data visualization seminars have been wildly popular around the country.

The Strictly Fellows will get hands-on instruction into understanding new ventures, digging into CEO compensation, mining gold from financial statements and advice on how to craft big data-rich projects. The Business Professors will learn how to create a class WordPress page, ways to translate print and online text into broadcast copy, and hear from previous business journalism students what they wish they’d learned before they got their jobs. Plus, much, much more.

(And, you’ll get to visit Phoenix. In January.)

Sold?

Journalists, apply here

Business professors, apply here

But hurry! The deadline is Nov. 1, 2014 at 11:59 PM Pacific Time.

We’ll be reviewing applications next week and hope to notify the winning applications ASAP.

Have questions? Contact Elizabeth Mays, Assistant Director of the Donald W. Reynolds National Center for Business Journalism, at elizabeth.mays@asu.edu.

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Join the #MoneyNerds at Reynolds Week 2015

Univision's Chiqui Cartagena will be a keynote speaker at Reynolds Week 2015.

Univision’s Chiqui Cartagena will be a keynote speaker at Reynolds Week 2015.

Whether you’re covering money or teaching it, YOU are the kind of person who should attend Reynolds Week 2015.

Choose from two tracks, for #moneynerds of all stripes:

Strictly Financials, a deep dive into financial and business topics for journalists, whether you cover money topics as a regular beat, or just on an occasional basis.
Business Professors Seminar, for people teaching at the college level who plan to teach finance topics, or want to include business journalism and money coverage in their curriculum.

Reynolds Week will be held Jan. 5-7, at the Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication at Arizona State University in downtown Phoenix. (Did we mention this is in Phoenix, in January?)

Tuition, lodging and most meals are covered by a $1,500 fellowship for those who are accepted. You only need to cover your airfare.

If you’ve come before, don’t let that stop you from returning. Past participants are welcome to reapply.

This year’s conference will feature a full lineup of fresh material and dynamic speakers including Chiqui Cartegena, vice president of corporate marketing for Univision. Cartegena is a Hispanic media and marketing pioneer with 25 years of experience developing publications appealing to Latinos, including People en Espanol.

She is the author of Latino Boom! and Latino Boom II.  She plans to bring a wealth of data and offer help on story ideas for journalists and assignments by professors.

Bonus: Reynolds Week participants will receive an autographed copy of her latest book.

Both sessions also will receive deep-data dive presentations taught by Dianne Finch, a Bloomberg News veteran and professor at Elon University whose data visualization seminars have been wildly popular around the country. Plus, you’ll hear from many other instructors, presenters and editors on topics such as CEO compensation, teaching business for broadcast and understanding entrepreneurs. (And, you’ll get to visit Phoenix. In January.)

Sold?

Journalists, apply here

Business professors, apply here

But hurry! The deadline is Nov. 1, 2014 at 11:59 PM Pacific Time.

Have questions? Contact Elizabeth Mays, Assistant Director of the Donald W. Reynolds National Center for Business Journalism, at elizabeth.mays@asu.edu.